Revealed: the ‘Outstanding’ primary schools that fail to teach children the 3Rs | newschoolsnetwork.org

Revealed: the ‘Outstanding’ primary schools that fail to teach children the 3Rs

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
+++ Over 200 primaries given top Ofsted grade fail to master the basics. Thousands more ‘Good’ schools also falling short for their students ++

New analysis casts doubt over the accuracy of Ofsted judgements, with more than a third of primary schools rated as Good or Outstanding by Ofsted failing to ensure that enough of their students get the basics in reading, writing and adding up.

By the end of their primary education, 11 year olds are expected to achieve at least Level 4 across these basic skills. Research has shown that this is the level needed if children are to go on and successfully secure five GCSEs at A*- C. In fact evidence shows that without this foundation, just six per cent of students go on to achieve five good GCSEs.

Across the country, 80% of children reach Level 4, but one in three (33.2%) of schools graded as Good or Outstanding is falling short of this average achievement – a total of 3,802 schools.

In fact one in ten Outstanding primaries – the highest available Ofsted rating – failed to help pupils master the basics.

This inconsistency is apparent across the country. Local authorities in every region of the country have schools rated as Good or Outstanding that still fail too many children on basic literacy and numeracy.

The same pattern is also evident when you look at pupils’ progress. Taking into account the starting point of different pupil intakes, primary schools are expected to see their pupils make two or more levels of progress. But nearly half (44%) of all Good or Outstanding primaries failed to match the average number of children achieving this in reading, writing or maths, whilst almost one in ten failed to make the grade in any of these important subjects.

 

Nick Timothy, Director of New Schools Network said:

“Strong accountability is critical to the success of our schools system. Free schools and academies are already more accountable than maintained schools. They are accountable to the Education Funding Agency for their finances, to Regional Schools Commissioners for their performance, and they’re accountable to central government which can, in extremis, close them down.

“But this research shows that more needs to be done to improve accountability in the system as a whole. Parents will be shocked to know that primary schools that are called ‘Good’ or ‘Outstanding’ are failing to equip enough of their pupils with the basics in literacy and numeracy.

“We urgently need hundreds of good, new schools, and we need existing successful schools to open new schools and take over others. This is the only way we will answer the twin challenge of meeting rising demand for school places and improving school standards across the country.”

 

Suella Fernandes, Member of the Education Select Committee commented:

“It's clear that OFSTED urgently requires reform. Not only do OFSTED inspections place an unreasonable amount of pressure on teachers -it's one of the main reasons cited for leaving the profession - but the inspection results are now shown to be inaccurate and unreliable. Its inspection methods need to be changed and its remit reviewed. As part of my work on the Education Select Committee, I hope to keep pushing for these long overdue reforms.”

 

Regional breakdown

All but four local authorities have a higher proportion of schools rated ‘Good’ or ‘Outstanding’ than the proportion of schools performing above the Key Stage 2 national average. The 20 local authorities with the highest proportion of ‘Outstanding’ or ‘Good’ schools that are below average for Level 4 attainment are below:

LA

Region

% of 'Outstanding' or 'Good' schools that are below national average for proportion of students achieving L4 attainment

% of 'Outstanding' or 'Good' schools that are below national average for proportion of students achieving at least two levels of progress in either reading, writing or maths

% of 'Outstanding' or 'Good' schools that are under-performing as defined by DfE

Rutland

East Midlands

75.00%

66.67%

25.00%

Poole

South West

72.73%

81.82%

0.00%

Luton

East of England

58.06%

74.19%

3.23%

Kingston upon Hull, City of

Yorkshire and The Humber

57.45%

46.81%

0.00%

Liverpool

North West

56.98%

54.65%

4.65%

Portsmouth

South East

52.38%

66.67%

0.00%

North East Lincolnshire

Yorkshire and The Humber

50.00%

56.25%

0.00%

Bristol, City of

South West

49.32%

46.58%

5.48%

Nottingham

East Midlands

48.08%

46.15%

1.92%

South Tyneside

North East

47.22%

36.11%

5.56%

Walsall

West Midlands

46.15%

53.85%

7.69%

Blackburn with Darwen

North West

45.95%

51.35%

2.70%

Plymouth

South West

45.83%

45.83%

4.17%

Dorset

Dorset

45.07%

46.48%

4.23%

Norfolk

Norfolk

44.92%

63.64%

5.35%

Bradford

Yorkshire and The Humber

44.44%

44.44%

3.03%

Knowsley

North West

44.19%

48.84%

4.65%

Middlesbrough

North East

44.12%

23.53%

0.00%

Birmingham

West Midlands

43.75%

42.31%

3.37%

Derby

East Midlands

43.59%

46.15%

7.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review the full press release with notes and analysis.